Tips for Long Distance AirTravel

Tips for Long Distance AirTravel

By | 2018-05-07T10:47:57+00:00 April 10th, 2018|Air Travel|0 Comments

7 Travel Tips From the AllWorld Pro StaffTraveling long distance this year?   Will you be flying across the State on business, or to the other side of the world for your dream vacation? No matter why you’re heading to the airport, boarding a plane, and checking into a hotel, travel can be time-consuming, energy draining, and even soul-crushing at times. Lucky for you, we have our AllWorld travel pros come up with their best tips to make your travel more fun, efficient, and comfortable in this ongoing series.  Don’t miss out on yesterday’s post!

Here are our first seven travel tips:

1. Make sure to upload the communications apps Viber, Line, and WhatsApp (or at least one of them) before you travel, as you can use them to make free (or ridiculously cheap) calls back home or anywhere abroad using Wi-Fi. They’re also great for adding new friends to your contact and messaging them, sharing photos, videos, or other travel experiences.

2. Have you ever walked out to curb after a grueling flight and wanted nothing more than to get your hotel, take a hot shower, and get some rest? Too bad, as you see that there’s a mile-long queue (line) to get a taxi! Don’t stress – and don’t waste your time in line with the rest of the mere travel mortals. Just jump on Grab and Uber (you can even order it while you’re still picking up your luggage so there really won’t be a delay!) as they operate in most maj or cities around the world now.

3. Grab or Uber aren’t available? AllWorld travelers still won’t settle for getting in an hour-long taxi line with everyone else, so they simply head over to the airport’s arrival terminal, where they’ll find a nonstop supply of empty taxis leaving. You’re welcome!

4. Want a great meal on the plane that’s a little fresher and better-quality than the standard mass-produced fare? Order a vegetarian or kosher meal ahead of time and you’ll get just that. The added benefit is that they in-flight staff will serve you first out of everyone on the plane!

5. Jet lag kicking your ass (to put it nicely)? There are some things you can do to naturally minimize the night -is-day/day-is-night impact of jet lag and the time change. First off, skip the coffee, caffeinated drinks, and energy drinks. If you absolutely need a pick-me-up, try a more-gentle green tea. And lay off the booze. You may think it helps you sleep, but you’ll be up again in two hours and it will only delay your adjustment to the time change.

6. If you’re facing a particularly profound time change, you can start adjusting in advance of your trip. Stay up later (or wake up super early) to start your body gradually shifting towards the new time scheme in your destination. Another great way to get your body on the right time clock is to start altering your meal times, too – the rest of your systems will follow!

7. Long layover? There are a few things you can do to make the most of it. Why not exit the airport and make a day trip out of it, exploring the city you’re spending time in? Just check with the airline ahead of time to make sure you can do that without passing through immigration/needing a Visa, etc. And you’ll want to carry anything in your backpack/travel bag that you bring on the plane because you won’t have access to your checked luggage.

Of course, you should check out Tim’s post on accessories to bring with you any time you travel:

*The Complete List of Travel Accessories You Must Have in 2018.

Buying Luggage?  Here are a few of the best spots online to buy luggage:

Tips for Long Distance AirTravel
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Norm Schriever

About 

Norm Schriever is a blogger, Amazon best-sellling author, cultural mad scientist, and enemy of the comfort zone. His work appears in the Huffington Post, Business.com, Good Morning America, The Anderson Cooper Show on CNN, NBC, MSN, Yahoo, Hotels.com, and media all around the world.
Norm grew up in Connecticut and graduated from the University of Connecticut, where he was never accused of overstudying. After expatriating to Costa Rica in 2011, he started traveling the world and documenting what he saw. He now lives in Southeast Asia, writing his heart out and working with local charities.

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